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So my blu ray player died (PS3)...any EE's out there?

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  • So my blu ray player died (PS3)...any EE's out there?

    Hooray, on top of having a crummy day and a relative in the hospital, I tried to pop in a movie and my PS3's internal fan went into overdrive. About 15 mins in, the unit shut off, despite the fact that it was cool to the touch. After a few cooldowns, resets, etc, the unit won't even power on before going to a blinking red light.

    My first job a while back was doing some basic PC repair, so I'm not completely unfamiliar with this type of problem and my googling seems to have confirmed my suspicions; that the CPU itself is overheating due to age on the paste they used on the proc.

    It seems like there are a few "tutorials" on something geeks are calling a PS3 reflow, where they take it apart, clean off the CPU/GPU, use a heat gun on the unit, then reapply paste and put the unit back together.

    I guess my question is twofold.

    I've only seen a heat gun used to melt adhesive bindings (iphone screen repair), so I was shocked to see someone taking a heat gun and blasting the CPU and mobo. I'm guessing they are attempting to re-form any solder connections that have been broken, but my inexperience says seek a second opionion. Question 1: do you guys think the heat gun step is necessary?

    I was ready just to remove the CPU paste and reapply. But maybe I have this misdiagnosed. Question 2 (and 2b): has anyone else had this problem and was it fixed by something other than the "reflow?"

    If you want to see a video, just look on youtube for ps3 reflow part 3 (and 4). There are others, but this one was the most shocking at the time he spent applying heat.

    Thanks for any feedback!

  • #2
    its not just the heat sink paste, its a cold/broken solder joints. That is why you have to use a heat gun to get the solder to reflow.

    If you had access to one of these its really what should be used
    http://www.amazon.com/Aoyue-Solderin.../dp/B002NZYP38
    Kevin
    Motor City Custom Audio
    Your Onix and MELODY Dealer for MI,IN,IL,MO,IA,MN,WI and Canada
    Bringing you Chopped/Cut/Modified Subwoofer Kits and even Flames if you want

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    • #3
      Thanks for the tip, but no, I don't have access to a reworking station. (I've never even heard of one.) :doh! 1:

      It looks like I'm going to go buy a heat gun. The guys instructions are pretty specific about getting it HOT. Is he giving good enough advice or would you tweak his process?

      I really appreciate the help!

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      • #4
        Wow looking at the video, this doesn't look like an easy and safe ("touch the chips with the gun, and you've destroyed the motherboard." :eek:) process.

        Wish you good luck with the surgery!

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        • #5
          I watched this one
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J5fzUrP0pxs

          and I would go ahead and try it if I were you.
          what have you got to lose?

          Other option is to contact that guy and send your
          unit to him to fix - not sure what he charges,
          but it may cheaper than buying a heat gun and also
          the heat sink paste

          just imo
          M

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          • #6
            Ok folks, I've done the best I could do.

            Here's a follow up in case anyone else needs to try this.

            The issue appears to be caused by Sony's lead-free solder, and cheap CPU thermal paste with breaks down over time. It looks like the SLIM Ps3 models may avoid this fate. But if you love your original 60GB Backwards compatible unit, here's what I did.

            For reference, my PS3 model was a 40GB thick model, 2nd gen I believe. (bought in May 2008).

            I pulled the PS3 apart, taking photos so I knew where the screws needed to go, dusted it out and then removed the CPU paste on the mobo using qtips and rubbing alcohol.

            I used a heat gun on the back and front of the mobo where the CPU and GPUs are (using this as my guide. I set the heat gun temp to 650 and went on each piece for about 30 seconds.
            I let each side cool for at least 15 minutes, then put some server CPU paste we had at the office on and sealed it back up.

            It powered on and didn't fuss right away, so I'm up and running for now at least.

            I should be going to bed, but I need to test this thing to see if it holds up. John Marston has some killing to do.

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            • #7
              Well, the reflow lasted just under 1 month, for those that were interested. I'm going to give it a 2nd try. I'll try to hobble this thing along until the 4 comes out, then buy a used later model slim ps3.
              Thanks Sony, you assholes.

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              • #8
                Interesting, I bought the version just before the slim one launched. I believe it was supposed to be more power efficient.....wonder how long before I see this. I only got it for a Blu-ray player, and at the time [email protected] I had swore off SONY after prior experiences with their DVD players, probably should have stuck to my guns on that.

                I haven't had it on in a few months, hope it still powers up!
                Coach Pat Summitt - Folding at Home

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by tthurman
                  Interesting, I bought the version just before the slim one launched. I believe it was supposed to be more power efficient.....wonder how long before I see this. I only got it for a Blu-ray player, and at the time [email protected] I had swore off SONY after prior experiences with their DVD players, probably should have stuck to my guns on that.

                  I haven't had it on in a few months, hope it still powers up!
                  Supposedly the Xbox has similar issues. I'm sitting in a place where I don't want to give Sony any more money, but am worried about buying a used slim model. Right now, I'm going back to the trusty PS2 when I have a gaming fix to scratch.

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