Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Speaker Tuning by EAR.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Speaker Tuning by EAR.

    So where does one go about getting lead shot for speaker stands?

    I've used sand before but these current monitors weigh 36 pounds each so I wan something to weight them down.... I have always used sand before but I want to try something heavier...

    These are the stands I am gonna try.....

    http://www.transdecointl.com/32s_pic.htm#spike

    Any info would be appreciated....

    Sean

  • #2
    Check your local gun shop. You will be able to find it anywhere they sell shotgun reloading supplies.

    Comment


    • #3
      gotcha.... makes sense....

      Sean

      Comment


      • #4
        here's 50 pounds for $79 shipped.

        http://www.rotometals.com/Lead-Shot-...FSXyDAodXmLtAw

        I'd recommend the #9 for better density.

        Comment


        • #5
          I use Gamaliel Shooting Supply where Lawrence Brand Magnum Shot is 50 pounds is $65 delivered in pellet sizes #6-9.

          I like larger shot for it's better handling characteristics. ;) #9 is about 600 pellets per ounce, #6 is about 220. I used #4 last time. It's about 15 pounds per liter (see pic below). 15 pounds of solid lead occupies about 0.6 liters.

          EDIT: MY SWAG is that each of the linked stand would hold about 45 pounds of #4 shot. If the OP wants significantly more :eek: maybe #9 is best for him.

          "The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interred with their bones."

          Comment


          • #6
            Careful, California might not approve of your use of lead. :shiftyeyes:
            With a shovel...

            Comment


            • #7
              Perhaps mercury, or uranium then. Those are pretty heavy... :idea:
              Angel City Audio
              East Street Audio

              ACA, Melody, Onix, NuForce, KR Audio

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by woofersus
                Perhaps mercury, or uranium then. Those are pretty heavy... :idea:
                Tungsten (19.3 g/cm³) is far denser than mercury (13.55 g/cm³), and almost as dense as uranium (20.2 g/cm³). Lead is a lightweight at "only" 11.35 g/cm³.

                Tungsten alloys are readily available, safe, and the principle component of a range of heavy metals available from Mallory. The only reason I know any of this is that the tungsten alloy Mallory 3000, aka Mallory Metal, is used extensively in crankshaft balancing. :)

                McMaster-Carr sells a 12" rod, 2" in diameter for about $1200. :eek:
                "The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interred with their bones."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Speaker Tuning by EAR.

                  Jon and I have spoken about this at length...both publicly and on the phone.

                  Here is a great page and video from B&W on the subject of tuning a crossover for end-use by a well trained ear:

                  http://www.bowers-wilkins.com/Discover/Discover/Technologies/Crossover.html



                  As Jon has said, sound mechanical/physical design precedes proper crossover design. But just running numbers from manufacturer's spec sheets won't get you all the way in terms of a truly refined sound quality. An excerpt:

                  "The better the mechanical design, the simpler the electronic design can be. We are still working to understand fully why and how certain components influence the sound of a speaker. Different manufacturers’ versions of nominally the same component significantly alter the character of the sound, the only solution is to put our trust in our ears and to choose what sounds best. We carry out exhaustive listening tests rigorously assessing the performance of each component until we find the optimum component for each position in the circuit. Fine-tuning by ear is only possible if the crossover is simple and the section of the crossover that perhaps benefits most from our policy of listen-and-learn is the part handling the signal for the tweeter. In most Bowers & Wilkins speakers, it is carried by a single, ear-chosen component that preserves the very finest detail."

                  Emphasis mine.

                  Now I'm not drawing any comparisons...but I'm merely noting that B&W's engineers have arrived at essentially the same conclusions that Jon and I have. Proper modeling and measuring are a vital part of the equation; they just don't constitute THE WHOLE EQUATION. That's where experienced by-ear tuning comes into play.

                  This is applicable to a $100 pair of bookshelf speakers as much as it is to $50,000 reference pairs. In fact, I'd stick my neck out and say it may be more important in inexpensive designs since component variations tend to be more pronounced (regardless of spec sheet claims) in lower-end components.

                  -Collin

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by BufordTJustice
                    Now I'm not drawing any comparisons...but I'm merely noting that B&W's engineers have arrived at essentially the same conclusions that Jon and I have. Proper modeling and measuring are a vital part of the equation; they just don't constitute THE WHOLE EQUATION. That's where experienced by-ear tuning comes into play.

                    This is applicable to a $100 pair of bookshelf speakers as much as it is to $50,000 reference pairs. In fact, I'd stick my neck out and say it may be more important in inexpensive designs.
                    Good stuff. Thanks, Collin.

                    About the line I emphasized above, a set of very good drivers in a small two way design - where "small" is relative to the $50k system - does indeed depend on excellent tuning and that certain "design serendipity" that can push a remarkable inexpensive speaker way, way past what you expected of it.

                    The more elaborate system will beat it in size of sound, scope, weight, scale, extremes, dynamics, and a host of intellectually-interesting attributes; the sort of characteristics that show well in the specs and play well when the time comes to fill a space with a lot of acoustic horsepower.

                    But the much smaller system, having that brief roster of very good parts, a successful design, and some talented tuning, may very well beat it hands-down in terms of sheer, immersive, suspension-of-disbelief musicality.

                    The 5.25" 2-way Swan T200b is one such system. It has such a sense of walk-around-inside-the-sound that it's hard to put it in words; it satisfies if you want to get lost in the authenticity of the sound. You don't have to spend thousands, bench race for weeks in some forum, or pore over countless charts, tables, and magazines. You just hook em up and listen.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X