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Dressing up a 100 year old two story bungalow....

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  • Dressing up a 100 year old two story bungalow....

    As anal as I am about getting pictures, when we replaced all the windows in this house, I was with Feldco before they pulled the plug in Indy and didn't get any after pictures of JUST the window install. My "duties" as the showroom sales manager didn't allow me to get away and visit jobsites, unless there was a problem. I got before pictures of the project before we installed the windows, but Feldco closed before I could get the after's. I was able to get a LOT more pics after they called me at Complete Window and Door to do their siding and enclose their front porch.

    I really didn't want to use vinyl on this house, but the ultra premium EVERLAST siding just wasn't in the budget on this one. But I did use the best insulated foam backed panel I could. All in all, I think it's quite the transformation. Take a look and I think you'll agree.

    So this one starts from the beginning. Everything is in pretty rough shape. The house itself is rock solid. But, the exterior had been neglected for quite some time....






    Lots of rotted wood that needed to be replaced....


    I guess whoever did the roof, replaced (added) some knee braces to support the wide overhangs. The only problem was, they didn't space them properly and even built them incorrectly. You can see the long axis angled support 2" x 4" is actually turned the wrong way. The wide side of the 2" x 4" should be parallel to the house, but it's not. It's turned perpendicular. :doh! 1:


    They didn't want to spend the $$$ to remove and replace them, but we DID turn the long axis support the correct way before we covered them.

    This awning is a story in and of itself. It was made of steel and QUITE heavy. It needed to come down for us to complete the project (the siding, not the windows), so we CAREFULLY removed it, because they wanted it back up after we were done. More on it later....
    John W.
    Indy

  • #2
    Ok.... back where we started, we've got all new siding, new trim around the windows and doors and a couple of new sidelite storms. We re-used their existing storm door as it was only a couple of years old and actually, a pretty nice one.


    The rest of the changeover (again, new windows, insulated siding, window wraps, soffit and fascia covered and a whole lot of new wood rebuilding a lot of the fascia boards before wrapping them....







    Remember that huge, heavy, metal awning that we took down from the second floor? Well, it was all pitted and corroded, but the home owner was determined to keep it. So, we had it sandblasted and powder coated to match the new window wraps....


    Looks pretty nice huh? They thought so too. So the following spring, they called us to enclose the front porch. That's up next.
    John W.
    Indy

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    • #3
      Well, the first thing we had to do (I thought), was re secure the top concrete plates to the brick knee wall. They were loose and I thought all we needed to do was secure them. Of course, you KNOW what happened.... Once we got started, we literally needed to rebuild about 40% of the knee wall. At least my customer was cool with it. It looked really good, but as soon as you would touch one of the bricks, the mortar would crumble.




      Ok, the knee walls are rebuilt and the top plates secured. We are framing in the openings. They only wanted storm windows to keep the cost down. But we used really nice storms made by my favorite supplier, ProVia. Yes, along with the best doors anywhere, they also make the nicest storm window still around. Most storms are sold in the box stores anymore. And we know what kind of quality you're gonna get for $39.95. Junk, junk and more junk.

      Notice in this first picture, we are actually building these openings with stops. That way, the storms can be recess mounted on the stops and both sides of the wood framing wrapped with aluminum coil stock. They will look a LOT nicer that way from the outside rather than just surface mounting them. Which I guarantee, most companies would have done because it would have been a LOT easier. By wrapping the wood inside and out, it also makes the entire opening maintenance free.





      Once we had everything framed, we ordered the custom sized storm windows from ProVia. Here we are installed and wrapped.....




      On the custom sized storm door, we had to order it as an INSWING rather than a typical outswing because of the wide overhangs. Had we put a normal OUTSWING storm door there, you wouldn't have been able to open it even half way before it hit the overhang. The problem was, the concrete floor sloped "UP" or "Down from the main front door. So, we had to get a special sweep for the bottom of the storm door that flips up (making the door shorter) when you open it and release the plunger. Then as the door closes and the plunger is depressed against the jamb, the sweep flips down. A really cool solution to what would have been a BIG problem.



      Ok, remember where we started?



      And now, the old girl is all finished....




      She's all dressed up for the next 50 years. :applause: Nice transformation huh?
      John W.
      Indy

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      • #4
        Quadman ... if you could do that to people .... Think of the money you would make! :woo:

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        • #5
          Great work quad. Congrats on job well done.
          engtaz

          I love how music can brighten up a bad day.

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          • #6
            Beautiful! Great work! :salute:

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            • #7
              Thanks guys.... :applause:

              I really do enjoy it when there is a decent budget to work with. I often times find myself trying to squeeze as much as I can into a budget, just so that I'm pleased with the final out come. I can't tell you how many times I've gone ahead and added some stuff to a project (but not added anything to the price), just because I knew it would improve the end result.
              John W.
              Indy

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              • #8
                Man that looks awesome, nicely done! Seriously, completely changed the whole demeanor of the house :applause:

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by skeeter99
                  Man that looks awesome, nicely done! Seriously, completely changed the whole demeanor of the house :applause:
                  Thanks.... yeah, she looked tired and ready for bed in the before. But the after, she's all spiffed up and looks like she could cut a rug all night. :cool:
                  John W.
                  Indy

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