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Paging quadman and other wood workers

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  • Paging quadman and other wood workers

    thecomebackkid needs some expert advice (i.e. not me :yes:):
    http://www.tweakcityaudio.com/forum/...5&postcount=13

  • #2
    Sorry, I'm not a veneering guy. Now, if you want some expert advice on staining and finishing, I can help. But the actual veneering?.... I'm pretty clueless.
    John W.
    Indy

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    • #3
      +1 Staining and finishing I've done a fair amount. Veneering, not so much. I know that there are flexible vinyl veneers (think contact paper) that could be wrapped around a corner, but I'm surprised to hear that it could be done with wood.

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      • #4
        [taking a break from my wall and ceiling prep] There are a number of ways to contour wood veneer. The best is to use a vacuum press I believe. But I really have no idea how to do it at home without one. [/taking a break from my wall and ceiling prep]
        John W.
        Indy

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        • #5
          Thanks for the thread Don!

          I am having an issue with my last layer of polyurethane looking scratched if I sand it, and looking uneven if I don't. Any idea's? Should I be waxing over the poly?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by the7comeback7kid
            Thanks for the thread Don!

            I am having an issue with my last layer of polyurethane looking scratched if I sand it, and looking uneven if I don't. Any idea's? Should I be waxing over the poly?
            The problem with most comercial poly's at the home centers (Minwax for example) is that they are way, WAY too thick. You should thin poly down to about 70% poly - 30% mineral spirits for your first couple of coats. Then thin it further to about 50/50 for all final coats. It will "flow out" much nicer and dry a lot quicker as well.

            I don't know what number sand paper you used when sanding the poly but it should never be less than #220. I use #220 between the first and second coat and #320 between the last coats. I also wet sand before the final coat (with mineral spirits and #320). If you've cut the finish too deep with a lower number sand paper, what I would do is this: Buy some ultra white shellac flakes and mix a 2# cut with denatured alcohol. Don't make too much since you'll just throw it away when done (it doesn't keep very long). Take an old cotton tube sock and pour some of your fresh shellac into the tube sock. Wrap the sock with some muslin (or cheese cloth if you don't have any) and tie everything closed. Gently squeeze until the shellac oozes through your home made applicator and wipe it on. Shellac dries VERY quickly so work fast and keep a wet edge. Don't over wipe it. In fact, don't wipe it more than once.

            You will also need to work on a horizontal surface as the shellac will run, run, run everywhere if you don't. Let that dry thoroughly (about an hour) and apply a second coat. Let that one dry and apply a third. The shellac already on the piece, even though dry and hard to the touch, will instantly dissolve when you apply the next coat. So, you will be working one, two or three coats when you apply the final coat. But, this is what will help fill all crevices in your current poly. Once your final coat of shellac is dry (I would let it cure over night after the final coat).... apply your thinned down poly in two or three coats and you will have a scratch free, glassy mirror finish. All clean up with the shellac is accomplished using denatured alcohol. It works like a charm cleaning and dissolving the shellac (and smells good too :p)

            And BTW, don't buy any premixed shellac from the home center shelves. You have no idea how old it is and the stuff just doesn't work as well when it gets older. Do yourself a favor and buy fresh shellac flakes from your local woodworking shop (or on line of course) and mix it up in small batches yourself. It's so MUCH nicer to use when it's fresh.
            John W.
            Indy

            Comment


            • #7
              I think I did buy Minwax. Shame on me. I practiced on scrap so I won't need to fix anything. Just want to get things squared away for the real deal. I am using #400 sand paper. when I sand I get a white powder, and I wipe that off with a cloth. I can see all of the tiny scratches in the finish though. I will try thining it out. Any ideas on sanding better/differently?:fryingpan:

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              • #8
                Originally posted by the7comeback7kid
                I think I did buy Minwax. Shame on me. I practiced on scrap so I won't need to fix anything. Just want to get things squared away for the real deal. I am using #400 sand paper. when I sand I get a white powder, and I wipe that off with a cloth. I can see all of the tiny scratches in the finish though. I will try thining it out. Any ideas on sanding better/differently?:fryingpan:
                Try wiping the white powder off with mineral spirits or paint thinner. Just don't buy any of THIS: http://www.tweakcityaudio.com/forum/...2&postcount=41 paint thinner. :p

                Once you thin it down, you should be fine. Start on another end and try your poly thinned 70/30 for the first coat and then 50/50 on subsiquent coats. I think you'll like the results.
                John W.
                Indy

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by quadman
                  [taking a break from my wall and ceiling prep] There are a number of ways to contour wood veneer. The best is to use a vacuum press I believe. But I really have no idea how to do it at home without one. [/taking a break from my wall and ceiling prep]
                  This type of stuff is best left to someone with a lot of experience. I think if you concentrate on doing a nice job with seams in the corner you will be quite happy with the results. To wrap a continuous piece of veneer around a 90 degree corner would probably require the veneer to be wet as well, otherwise the wood fibers will break and tear. Vacuum presses are interesting tools and not outrageously expensive but I think they would be more useful with curves. YMMV

                  John, very informative stuff on the poly...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by django1
                    This type of stuff is best left to someone with a lot of experience. I think if you concentrate on doing a nice job with seams in the corner you will be quite happy with the results. To wrap a continuous piece of veneer around a 90 degree corner would probably require the veneer to be wet as well, otherwise the wood fibers will break and tear. Vacuum presses are interesting tools and not outrageously expensive but I think they would be more useful with curves. YMMV

                    John, very informative stuff on the poly...
                    Thanks Stephen....

                    I had too many bad experiences with the stuff and almost swore it off completely. But, once I learned how to use it.... ie: the consistancy, I found it remarkable stuff to use. You just have to have some patience with it.
                    John W.
                    Indy

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      +1 I decided that if you were using real wood instead of a veneer you would definitely have a seam. So, a small seam with veneer is actually more authentic than a wrapped veneer with no seam, even though that is what we are used to.
                      Originally posted by django1
                      This type of stuff is best left to someone with a lot of experience. I think if you concentrate on doing a nice job with seams in the corner you will be quite happy with the results. To wrap a continuous piece of veneer around a 90 degree corner would probably require the veneer to be wet as well, otherwise the wood fibers will break and tear. Vacuum presses are interesting tools and not outrageously expensive but I think they would be more useful with curves. YMMV

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                      • #12
                        Big thanks again guys. Ya'll are infinitely helpfull

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                        • #13
                          I would dump the midwax stuff. Look for Arm-R-Seal either on line or at a place like woodcraft. If you want to try the shellac trick you can find flakes at such a place as well. I'm sure shellac will give a nice buff look but I am not sure how durable such a finish would be. On a speaker it should be fine though.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mep
                            I would dump the midwax stuff. Look for Arm-R-Seal either on line or at a place like woodcraft. If you want to try the shellac trick you can find flakes at such a place as well. I'm sure shellac will give a nice buff look but I am not sure how durable such a finish would be. On a speaker it should be fine though.
                            Shellac can be a durable finish to a point, but it is very vulnerable in some areas. So, that's why I only use it as an intermediary step between stain and final finish. If you read my post, I said once the shellac was dry, he should then coat with the thinned poly.
                            John W.
                            Indy

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Ahh, I missed that part. I may have to try that trick some time.

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