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Gallo CL-3, No crossover, How possible?

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  • Gallo CL-3, No crossover, How possible?

    I recently read this review of the Gallo Classico CL-3 speaker at:
    http://www.theabsolutesound.com/arti...eaker-tas-224/

    The quote below says that it has no crossover, yet it uses a tweeter and mid woofers. How is this possible? Is it a good idea? If so, why is it so rare?

    "Gallo specifications table reveals this telling phrase: “Internal Crossover: None required.” Like many of Gallo’s Reference Series designs, the Classico CL-3 is essentially a crossover-free loudspeaker, which as you might expect yields audible benefits in openness, transparency, and freedom from crossover-induced sonic artifacts"

  • #2
    I'm assuming that they meant it has shallow crossover slopes (maybe 6dB per octave butterworths) with very few parts used.....there is NO WAY those three drivers are all running full range.

    Not possible.

    EDIT:

    I found this quote from the article, "Significantly, the CDT tweeter naturally acts as a roughly 6dB/octave high-pass filter that rolls in at about 3kHz, so that the tweeter is able to serve as its own crossover."

    Even then, the other drivers are not being run full range....and 6dB per octave starting at 3k sounds awfully shallow to me.

    THIS sounds like marketing goblety goop to me: "Finally, the Classico CL-3 employs what Gallo terms Optimized Pulse Technology (OPT) Level 2. OPT “applies a dielectric absorption countermeasure to eliminate sonic degradation from static charges that typically build up on speaker wires and within the speaker itself.”"

    Realistically, I don't see those two midbass drivers and the tweeter getting along without some type of crossover in place...even if it is minimal.

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    • #3
      Gallos are good speakers, but they are very guilty of using marketing mumbo jumbo.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by gtpsuper24
        Gallos are good speakers, but they are very guilty of using marketing mumbo jumbo.
        It sure seems that way. "Gallo terms Optimized Pulse Technology... " seems ridiculous. You would think that the market for speakers this expensive would be put off by this kind of nonsense. However, I have a Yamaha Aventage receiver with a fifth foot that they call "Anti-Resonance Technology (A.R.T.) Wedge" so maybe I shouldn't talk. At least I didn't buy it for its fifth foot.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by newspeakers
          It sure seems that way. "Gallo terms Optimized Pulse Technology... " seems ridiculous. You would think that the market for speakers this expensive would be put off by this kind of nonsense. However, I have a Yamaha Aventage receiver with a fifth foot that they call "Anti-Resonance Technology (A.R.T.) Wedge" so maybe I shouldn't talk. At least I didn't buy it for its fifth foot.
          I don't want to give the impression that it's cheesy stuff or not a quality product...it might be that the engineering behind the idea and its execution are completely sound...but some dolt marketer went off-reservation and created a bunch of mumbo-jumbo.

          A great example is the "A.R.T. wedge" on your Yamaha. It's a great idea and, while it may not prevent "resonance", it certainly does make for a much more stable and robust chassis for the amplifier...which is always a good thing. It also reduces the pressure per square inch placed on each foot...which is a consideration for people who use glass shelves (like me). Spreading the load out over more contact points is more gooder in that case.

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          • #6
            My guess is that the midbass drivers have been designed for a fairly well damped lowpass function and somehow the tweeter has suitable impedance rise to allow it - if designed to naturally meet the target crossover frequency, phase, level, and slope, which is no small challenge - to mesh to the midwoofers without ruining the overall system's impedance magnitude.

            In general, in a twin woofer system I can't think of too many ways to not use each driver differently, and personally I'd always expect the electrical crossover to be the place to tune the design, but I suppose a crossoverless system is possible...if you shoot for an intentionally limited midbass driver, which typically means high motor distortion too.

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