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Help with picking the right Chane products for my needs.

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  • Help with picking the right Chane products for my needs.

    I’m copy/pasting this from the L series thread in an effort to not derail the other thread from its main topic. :)

    This was started by me asking about the suggested minimum distances between the listener and the speakers. A straight, perpendicular line from the MLP to the front main wall in my space is about 10 feet. So to be clear, this is not taking into account the depth of the speakers plus any necessary distance from the wall to the back of the speaker.

    Originally posted by Chane M&C View Post

    Just for the record, there's not a fixed minimum. With a little aiming and assuming a seated listener, almost any model is fine. The MTM models - A2.4, L3c, 752, etc - have an advantage that comes from their symmetric layouts, but even the big 753 can work well at 10' feet. We aim for design and tuning that tends to be fairly forgiving.

    For the record. I offer this because there are other benefits that could even make a seemingly less suitable model more attractive if it serves another goal.

    How close is your spacing, Gerry? And what's the effect you're after - loudness, home theater-only, the last drop of musicality, lots of axial audience spread? What's the greater context beyond dimensions?
    Thanks for taking the time to help me with this, Jon. Since this might be off topic for this thread, would you like me to make a separate thread?

    Anyways. The best spacing we can do in the room is an equilateral triangle among the MLP and main speakers with a 9.5 foot length. That is, 9.5 feet between the *tweeters* and 9.5 feet between a *tweeter* and your ear at the ideal seating position. So this means that the center channel would have to be a bit closer, more like 8.5 feet. Another constraint is that the right speaker must be in a corner (yes, I know) and the left speaker cannot be in a corner to match the right; the space is offset to the right by a doorway on the left.

    The end goal is going to have either a 5.2.4 or 7.2.4 immersive setup, but it will take time to get there. I’ll have a 3.2 setup for a long time. Main priority here is home theater, but music is important. I’m trying to go for an expansive sounding sound stage slightly off axis. We’re going to have a loveseat in the center, so neither of us will actually be sitting in the exact main listening position, if that makes sense.

    One type of sound I’m trying to avoid is a shallow image. I’ve heard setups where the frequency response is spot on, but it “feels” like all the sound is coming form a flat plane in front of me. I want it to have some depth and volume. If it can sound like it’s coming from beyond the wall, I’d be very happy.

    I don’t really think loudness matters, within reason. We typically consider “loud” at the “70” level on our Denon X4500. Not a scientifically accurate reference, I know, but crazy people on another forum love to talk about their 90+ listening, which is insane to me.

    I’m not entirely sure if this was what you were asking, but I hope that’s enough to get me going. I’m absolutely open to suggestions and would appreciate it! Thanks!

  • #2
    Originally posted by Gerry View Post
    This was started by me asking about the suggested minimum distances between the listener and the speakers. A straight, perpendicular line from the MLP to the front main wall in my space is about 10 feet. So to be clear, this is not taking into account the depth of the speakers plus any necessary distance from the wall to the back of the speaker.

    ***

    The best spacing we can do in the room is an equilateral triangle among the MLP and main speakers with a 9.5 foot length. That is, 9.5 feet between the *tweeters* and 9.5 feet between a *tweeter* and your ear at the ideal seating position. So this means that the center channel would have to be a bit closer, more like 8.5 feet. Another constraint is that the right speaker must be in a corner (yes, I know) and the left speaker cannot be in a corner to match the right; the space is offset to the right by a doorway on the left.

    The end goal is going to have either a 5.2.4 or 7.2.4 immersive setup, but it will take time to get there. I’ll have a 3.2 setup for a long time. Main priority here is home theater, but music is important. I’m trying to go for an expansive sounding sound stage slightly off axis. We’re going to have a loveseat in the center, so neither of us will actually be sitting in the exact main listening position, if that makes sense.

    One type of sound I’m trying to avoid is a shallow image. I’ve heard setups where the frequency response is spot on, but it “feels” like all the sound is coming form a flat plane in front of me. I want it to have some depth and volume. If it can sound like it’s coming from beyond the wall, I’d be very happy.

    I don’t really think loudness matters, within reason. We typically consider “loud” at the “70” level on our Denon X4500. Not a scientifically accurate reference, I know, but crazy people on another forum love to talk about their 90+ listening, which is insane to me.

    I’m not entirely sure if this was what you were asking, but I hope that’s enough to get me going. I’m absolutely open to suggestions and would appreciate it! Thanks!
    Short answer: The L7 and L6 combo, or if budget won't permit, all L3c. All go to 6 or 7 on the loudness 10 scale, and all go way up on the image and soundstage scale. (The L7 images better than all but one system I've heard and that system was impossibly unique and won't ever happen again. In terms of a production speaker, the L7 is to my admittedly limited experience the image leader in terms of width, height, and depth, and the L3c is terms of sheer cohesive density within a slightly smaller picture than the L7. I can get palpable singers just in front of the plane of the speakers from the same recordings that create effects fifteen feet behind them out into the yard.)

    The L6 is the match for an L7 L&R pair, and the L3c is its own center and main.

    Add an active bass system to pick up some acoustical size - some loudness - and unless you need the added 6dB or so the big 700's bring, you should be fine.

    If BTJ happens along he might add to this. He's got more time on the L3c and 752 than I do, and in more rooms than I. He's also heard some exotic hifi shop stuff lately, if I'm not mistaken.

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    • #3
      Alright. I got the wife to approve the color of the L series, so we’re in. I’ll go with the L7/L6 combo, budget permitting. Looking forward to the release. Thanks!

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