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  • Bring on the double D’s.

    Danish Drivers....😂👍🏻

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    • While we're waiting on the L's to be released, what can you tell us about the low (volume) level performance compared to normal or even "spirited" levels (all relative of course). I'm mostly interested in the L7's, but I'm sure others would be interested in the rest of the line as well. Some speakers don't come alive until you get them up to a certain level. What (in general) leads to a speaker performing well at "background" volume levels? Efficiency, individual drivers, driver integration, crossovers, or is it just the entire package?

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      • Originally posted by Spidacat View Post
        While we're waiting on the L's to be released, what can you tell us about the low (volume) level performance compared to normal or even "spirited" levels (all relative of course). I'm mostly interested in the L7's, but I'm sure others would be interested in the rest of the line as well. Some speakers don't come alive until you get them up to a certain level. What (in general) leads to a speaker performing well at "background" volume levels? Efficiency, individual drivers, driver integration, crossovers, or is it just the entire package?
        We are still waiting on a review from out most esteemed BTJ. Cannot wait to read it

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        • Originally posted by Spidacat View Post
          While we're waiting on the L's to be released, what can you tell us about the low (volume) level performance compared to normal or even "spirited" levels (all relative of course). I'm mostly interested in the L7's, but I'm sure others would be interested in the rest of the line as well. Some speakers don't come alive until you get them up to a certain level. What (in general) leads to a speaker performing well at "background" volume levels? Efficiency, individual drivers, driver integration, crossovers, or is it just the entire package?
          Good question. We could start by sorting speakers into general categories.

          The fullrange driver generally has the advantage in terms of low level responsiveness. The very high energy motor, the light cone, and a complete lack of crossover and audible crossover artifacts like phase rotation and time error give this family audible degrees of subjective "speed" and sheer definition. They won't always win points for ruler-flat amplitude responses, and they almost never plumb frequency extremes and reach high levels, but they are kings of revealing what's in the signal. See: Supravox, Fertin, Lowther, Feastrex, Fostex, and scores of others. We have plans to develop a realistic, usable alternative without resorting to extreme acoustical loading like backhorns or tuned pipes.

          Somewhere in the design spectrum for more conventional multiway speakers is the textbook design emphasizing a neutral or flat amplitude response. This class is marketed for the technical customer who conflates that flat-line microphone response for what's called accuracy. These designs will involve a number of other errors - there's no free lunch - that arguably impair the qualities the single fullrange driver speaker is known and regarded for. However this category also doesn't suffer their somewhat non-flat response either.

          In this second class is a variant, which is the multiway built to similar ostensible response goals that doesn't convincingly meet them. This variant is typified by a rising response with increasing frequency, with a lean bass and midbass and let-out, forward upper registers some listeners mistake for more or better resolution. It's neither classically "accurate" or microphone neutral but it can still be attractive, especially to more casual listeners. (It reminds me personally of the switchbox and wall of speakers demo in old stereo stores. The product was generally cheaper and relative to today's products, more primitive, but the average customer would gravitate toward the speaker with more of everything - treble, midrange, bass - an indicator not of guaranteed quality but not uncommonly the want of it.)

          For our models we always start with a neutral response goal, but we also include specific design goals aimed at making the speaker acoustically integrate and disappear. The desired final effect is a window onto or into the original recording space, which is achieved with the aid of a careful stereo triangle of speakers and listener, good upstream gear, and quality recordings. Reaching this audible effect in the most compelling way we know how involves deviating from both textbook responses and designs, not starkly but consciously nevertheless.

          If we're successful, which we ultimately leave to our customers, the speaker has better than average responsiveness to music input while not suffering the flaws above. And since each camp involves compromise, ours included, the pragmatic approach becomes just as distinct a class in the long run. Occasionally I see designs that show obvious attention to design elements other than the obvious goals, and as confirmation I see that reviewers of those designs tend to point out their sonic attributes. Form follows function and vice versa.

          I think you'll find a Chane an excellent competitor for the heart of the size and cost market, and I think you'll find a Chane a musically sensitive speaker that while it can't have the sheer instantaneous aliveness of a far smaller, arguably less neutral fullrange driver, also lacks the homogenized sound of a textbook design or the artificial sound of a non-flat speaker. In the end we're perfectly happy to deviate from a lab-flat amplitude response for its own sake ourselves but we also insist on as musically balanced a response as experience knows how to make.

          PS: The L Series SB Acoustics drivers are developed and known for excellent downward dynamic range, or micro detail. (A pair of some of their drivers designed for excellent wideband response heard fullrange and without a crossover is a very telling experience.) Special motors and suspensions on light cones get down into the finer aspects of good recordings while still having good dynamics and reasonable loudness levels. While they're not specifically developed for high levels - and we don't recommend L for that either - if anything can remain responsive at low level - without resorting to a rising response to get an amped-up substitute for it - these drivers can. We just try to use them in ways that preserve that character.

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          • Originally posted by Spidacat View Post
            While we're waiting on the L's to be released, what can you tell us about the low (volume) level performance compared to normal or even "spirited" levels (all relative of course). I'm mostly interested in the L7's, but I'm sure others would be interested in the rest of the line as well. Some speakers don't come alive until you get them up to a certain level. What (in general) leads to a speaker performing well at "background" volume levels? Efficiency, individual drivers, driver integration, crossovers, or is it just the entire package?
            I’ve been so slammed at work but I’ll add a few comments.

            Your question is actually a good one. I’ve found that drivers with really stiff suspensions that also need to make bass have a relationship with output kinda like an old, highly tuned pushrod V8. It will definitely rev to 7000rpm, but it feels like a 4-cylinder until it “comes onto the cam” around 4000-4500. Some speakers are like that; where you need to lean on them.... turn them up loud enough so that they feel alive.

            To answer your question, these SB drivers have particularly compliant and precise suspensions and they sound amazingly alive, textured, and dynamic at all output levels. Both in a large room at a friendly local Audio Dealer (who recently took my money in exchange for my new tube amp, lol) and in my apartment living room, which is tiny. In fact, their ability to “play big” at low levels and present that startling amount of lower level, inner detail was one of the first comments I made to Jon. One of the aspects of their performance that makes them sound ‘expensive’.

            So, to fully answer your question, the L’s sound great at lower volume levels and don’t change as volume rises. They come across, in modern car terms, like a highly computer managed twin turbo V6; a plateau of power (performance) that starts early and hangs around for the concert later on.

            Comment


            • Somewhere in the design spectrum for more conventional multiway speakers is the textbook design emphasizing a neutral or flat amplitude response. This class is marketed for the technical customer who conflates that flat-line microphone response for what's called accuracy. These designs will involve a number of other errors - there's no free lunch
              First of all, I appreciate it when you elucidate a bit. In the no free lunch category, which is so frustratingly true, are you referring to the phase distortions of higher order slopes? I'm trying to understand how you differentiate from that particular design philosophy. In my mind, you have some bandwidth leeway with the drivers to go a different direction, if you so desire, and that is compelling to me. I'm referring particularly to the L3.

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              • Originally posted by Vergiliusm View Post
                In the no free lunch category, which is so frustratingly true, are you referring to the phase distortions of higher order slopes? I'm trying to understand how you differentiate from that particular design philosophy. In my mind, you have some bandwidth leeway with the drivers to go a different direction, if you so desire, and that is compelling to me. I'm referring particularly to the L3.
                Generally speaking by the time you get to a 3-way or even a 4-way speaker the cumulative effect of the driver cascade is such that equivalent energy storage becomes problematic, and has a distinctive audible effect ... as everything must. As a 2-way the L3 you mention is far easier to optimize which creates a nicely musical sound more consistent with the recording than a conventional 3+ way speaker.

                Incidentally, the L3 is a fairly big speaker for a 2-way, and at 20 liters is definitely a stand monitor. We're working out the details for a L2 5.25" "bookshelf" using similar design principles.

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                • Thought I saw in one of the earlier posts that the L series are being shipped out of the midwest area? For those of us in that general vicinity any more details and/or possibility of a direct pickup if it's a relatively close proximity? (once these are officially available of course)

                  Just curious if an option to cut transit time/cost for those of us in the area potentially...

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                  • Originally posted by superfan View Post
                    Just curious if an option to cut transit time/cost for those of us in the area potentially...
                    Certainly is. We delivered a set of three 700s last week this way. Greater Milwaukee. Once they launch simply get in touch and we can make arrangements.

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                    • Originally posted by Chane M&C View Post

                      Certainly is. We delivered a set of three 700s last week this way. Greater Milwaukee. Once they launch simply get in touch and we can make arrangements.
                      Click image for larger version

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                      • Nobody Knows the Longing I have
                        Nobody knows my yearning
                        Please sell my l7 and 6 soon
                        My eardrums they are a burning




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                        • Haikus often just
                          Don’t make sense for speaker sales
                          I want the L7

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                          • I bet my buddy who owns the Buchardt S400 that the L3C will out preform his Buchardts even though they both use SB Acoustic drives.

                            😀👍🏻

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                            • Originally posted by Ehill View Post
                              I bet my buddy who owns the Buchardt S400 that the L3C will out preform his Buchardts even though they both use SB Acoustic drives.

                              😀👍🏻
                              Having heard both, I would say that’s a safe bet. But the S400 is no slouch.

                              The biggest difference is going to be in downward detail and overall refinement, with Chane taking solid wins in those areas. Bass will be close, but I prefer Jon’s tuning in bass regions by a little bit. But bass is always very room dependent.

                              If the L3c’s even tie the S400’s, that’s high praise considering the cost HALF as much.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by BufordTJustice View Post

                                Having heard both, I would say that’s a safe bet. But the S400 is no slouch.

                                The biggest difference is going to be in downward detail and overall refinement, with Chane taking solid wins in those areas. Bass will be close, but I prefer Jon’s tuning in bass regions by a little bit. But bass is always very room dependent.

                                If the L3c’s even tie the S400’s, that’s high praise considering the cost HALF as much.
                                Heck, if they even come close, they L's will still be big winners! Those S400s are expensive!!

                                Chane = value. Excellent fidelity that can exceed/match/approach much more expensive speakers, at much lower cost. Why pay more?

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